No 7-Eleven

Resisting Chain Stores and Corporate Control


7-Eleven Returns To Their Junk Food Roots

7-Eleven Junk FoodThis time last year 7-Eleven was trying to be the go-to place for healthy snacks. Looks like they gave up on that mission. At the recent 7-Eleven Franchise Owners Association of Chicagoland Trade Show, 7-Eleven wasted no time in hawking “jacked” Doritos, energy drinks and Pringles.

Snack Watch: 7-Eleven Franchisee Trade Show [CPS net]


7-Eleven’s Healthy Food Options

7-Eleven Bowery Slurpee LiteBreaking news in the East Village: 7-Eleven’s “healthy food options” have arrived at the Bowery 7-Eleven. What are they you ask? Salads? Vegetarian food? Vegan options? No. Lite Slurpees with goofy names like Slurpee Lite Sugar Free Sprite and Slurpee Fanta Oddball Orange. Lite Slurpees – much like Diet Doritos – are an oxymoron. Once again it’s nothing but junk food from 7-Eleven.

7-Eleven St. Marks PlaceMeanwhile, what’s this? Does 7-Eleven have a new import/export business? Kidding!

Noted [EV Grieve]
7-Eleven Kicks Off Summer With New Slurpee Lite Flavor [Convenience Store News]

Related

7-Eleven Shifts Focus to Healthier Food Options [NY Times]
7-Eleven Adds to Prepared Foods Menu [The Global Fruit]
Diabetes? There’s a 7-Eleven App for That! [No 7-Eleven]
7-Eleven’s Identity Crisis: Health Food Nuts or Junk Food Huts? [No 7-Eleven]


7-Eleven Opens 3,600-Sq.-Ft Junk Food Cave in Flatiron

7-Eleven 182 Fifth AvenueDNAinfo is reporting on yet another 7-Eleven opening, this time in the Flatiron district. The 3,600-Sq.-ft. 7-Eleven located at 182 Fifth Avenue sells – you guessed it – a lot of junk food and features a Slurpee station.

The first floor, which includes a sprawling coffee and Slurpee station, spans about 2,700 square feet, with the mezzanine floor made up of 900 square feet featuring seven tables with chairs.

Despite the size, the store’s offerings remain the same with hot dogs, pizza and empanadas, as well as a section for prepackaged cold sandwiches to take out.

Turnpike dining right on Fifth Avenue! Nothing is too good for us! So much for those healthy eating options Margaret Chabris.

7-Eleven Opens Two-Story, 3,600-Sq.-Ft. Superstore with Slurpee Station [DNA info]


Junk Food Extravaganza at 7-Eleven 171 Madison Ave

7-Eleven 171 Madison Avenue

Junk food! Junk food! Junk food!

7-Eleven spokesperson Margaret Chabris sure has some explaining to do!

For months Chabris has been talking about New York City’s “underserved”  neighborhoods and how she and her Texas-based 7-Eleven chains are going to bring healthier food options to NYC –  as if Manhattan is some third-world country in need of fresh food and drinking water. Walking past this 7-Eleven at 171 Madison Avenue today, we couldn’t help but notice the cornucopia of junk food being advertised in the window. Mini Tacos! Pizza! More Mini Tacos! More pizza! It’s almost as healthy looking as the 7-Eleven website and their nifty new junk food app!

To be fair, there’s nothing wrong with pizza or tacos. But as 7-Eleven plans an additional 100 locations for Manhattan, the reason for the invasion, they claim, is New York City is “underserved” and they are bringing healthy eating options to us. Is there any neighborhood in Manhattan currently facing a pizza shortage? Is pizza considered healthy? So far the only thing 7-Eleven has done is push out local business and create a crime-friendly corner of urban blight. The corporate talk and the reality of what’s taking place doesn’t add up.


7-Eleven’s Identity Crisis: Health Food Nuts or Junk Food Huts?

As 7-Eleven bulldoze their way into New York City, their PR machine is hard at work trying to reinvent the Texas-based cigarette/gas/beer chain as some type of healthy eating oasis for our “underserved” neighborhoods. No small feat considering 7-Eleven is synonymous with KFC bucket-sized sodas, perpetually rotating hot dogs and mashed potatoes served from a vending machine.

But what they tell the press and what they market through their website, social media accounts and that awful junk food app are two completely different things.

7-Eleven - Website full of junk foodOn the 7-Eleven website, a majority of the products featured are unhealthy to say the least: sugary energy drinks, Mountain Dew soda and unidentifiable fried things.

7-Eleven - Facebook page full of junk foodThe 7-Eleven Facebook page isn’t much better. Of the 15 items shown, only 2 of them – water and fruit – are healthy.

Twitter feed full of junk foodIf you’re looking to slip into a sugar coma, look no further than the 7-Eleven Twitter account. Wash down a pile of greasy mini-tacos and a candy bar with a bucket of Big Gulp! SO healthy!

7-Eleven - App full of junk foodAnd let’s not forget their GPS junk food locator app!

Of course local bodegas carry some of these items as well but they don’t use junk food and sugar as their main marketing message the way 7-Eleven does. In a time when childhood obesity – and adult obesity for that matter – is on the rise, do we really need 7-Eleven’s junk food shacks on every corner? Don’t our neighborhoods deserve better?